U.S. Pacific Command

 
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  Joint Interagency Task Force West

           Rear Admiral Donna L. Cottrell





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Contact Information


Main Office Note: FedEx & UPS Deliveries Use Phone Numbers

Joint Interagency Task Force West
Box 64033
Camp H.M. Smith, HI 96861-4033

 

JIATF West, Bldg 700 Elrod Rd, Room 131 
Camp H.M. Smith, HI 96861-4033
Attn: Contact Name and Phone Number.

DSN: 315-477-9708 /9715
TEL: (808) 477-9708/9715
FAX: (808) 477-9701


Individual Information

 

Title & Name Phone Number

Director
Rear Admiral Donna L. Cottrell, Director

(808) 477-9708
Deputy Director
Mr. Earl K. Hampton Jr. 
(808) 477-9708
Chief of Staff, CAPT Edward J. Eder, USN (808) 477-9715
Special Agent, Drug Enforcement Administration, Mr. Mike Carter (808) 477-9768
Special Agent, Homeland Security Investigations, Mr. Todd Horton (808) 477-9704
Operational Representative, Naval Criminal Investigative Service, Mr. George Dettman (808) 477-9745



About Joint Interagency Task Force West

Joint Interagency Task Force West (JIATF West) is the U.S. Pacific Command (USPACOM) Executive Agent for Department of Defense (DoD) support to law enforcement for counterdrug and drug-related activities. The JIATF West team is a composite of approximately 166 active duty, reserve, DOD civilian, contractor, and U.S. and foreign law enforcement agency personnel.

Mission

Joint Interagency Task Force West executes Department of Defense counterdrug activities on behalf of Commander, U.S. Pacific Command to both defend the Homeland and stabilize the theater by hardening the environment against the growth of transnational crime and disrupting transnational criminal organizations that threaten U.S. interests.

Organizational Vision

We are a trusted and valued partner for both U.S. and International Agencies - known for our professionalism, ethics, and exceptionalism in everything we do.

Regional Vision

The Indo-Asia-Pacific Region is stable and prosperous, and characterized by a rules based international order that minimizes the impacts from transnational organized crime.

Strategic End State

Organizations that threaten the U.S., its territories, and its interests are denied the ability to traffic illicit drugs and precursor chemicals used to produce illicit drugs in the USPACOM AOR; the environment is less permissive for their activities; and regional partnerships and stability are enhanced.

What We Do

We bring military and law enforcement capabilities together to combat drug-related transnational crime in the Asia-Pacific Region.

More Resources

  • JIATF West E-Newsletter Previous Editions            
  • JIATF West photostream on FLICKR
  •  

    White House/Office of National Drug Control Policy Links
  • Office of Nat'l Drug Control Policy
  • White House Strategy to Combat Transnational Organized Crime
  •                      

    Department of Justice

  • National Drug Intelligence Center Releases National Drug Threat Assessment
               
    State of Department
  • International Narcotics Control Strategy Reports
  • Bureau of International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs 
               
    United Nations
  • World Drug Report

  • Our Approach to Combating Transnational Crime

    Since arriving in Hawaii in 2004, JIATF West has developed a strategy with supporting activities to face the particular challenges of the Asia-Pacific region, and to meet the evolving needs of our law enforcement partners. JIATF West works closely with senior law enforcement leadership partners across the region to increase support to major law enforcement operations.

    Asia-Pacific criminal enterprise activities, including drug-trafficking, are organized on a business model of networked criminal service providers. The U.S. law enforcement strategy to combat these criminal networks concentrates on long-term criminal enterprise investigations in order to prosecute organizations' leadership and seize criminally gained assets. These efforts lead to disrupting and dismantling criminal enterprises. By joining forces with U.S. and foreign partner law enforcement agencies, we are able to effectively augment and enhance their ability to disrupt and dismantle transnational criminal enterprise networks.

    The JIATF West Strategy

    Our strategy is built on the premise of interagency cooperation. JIATF West partners with U.S. and foreign law enforcement agencies through regional U.S. Embassies and their respective country teams. We also partner with regional law enforcement agencies, such as New Zealand Police, Australian Federal Police, and Australian Customs Service, who coordinate complementary capabilities in the region. We bring military and law enforcement capabilities together to combat and reduce transnational crime in the Asia-Pacific.

    Partnerships enable three general categories of synergy and effectiveness:

    • Applying Intelligence Community resources to ongoing investigations
    • Building partner nation law enforcement capabilities to increase their effectiveness
    • Bring partners into a wider network of law enforcement agencies

    We offer specific programs to support the above categories:

    • Hands-on and classroom training (including search and seizure, riverine operations, marksmanship, small craft maintenance, land navigation, analytical methodologies-tools-practices-techniques, and other skills)
    • Physical building infrastructure development (building refurbishment, training facilities, operations center, border checkpoints, and other projects)
    • Information technology for command and control centers/information exchange
    • Intelligence analysis and related tradecraft to support investigations
    • Detection and monitoring of criminal trafficking and activities

    History

    In 1989 the U.S. military was given statutory responsibility to detect and monitor aerial and maritime illicit drug shipments to the United States. With this statutory responsibility, the first iteration of the national task force, Joint Task Force FIVE (JTF-5), stood up in Alameda, Calif.

    In 1994, the three Joint Task Forces (JTFs) were re-designated as Joint Interagency Task Forces (JIATFs) with expanded authorities under the National Interdiction Command and Control Plan (NICCP). The JIATFs coordinated and directed the detection, monitoring, and sorting of suspect drug-trafficking aircraft and vessels. Targets were turned over to appropriate U.S. law enforcement authorities for apprehension.

    In 1999, JIATF East merged with JIATF South. JIATF South is located in Key West, Fla., and continues to conduct counter illicit trafficking operations, intelligence fusion and multi-senior correlation to detect, monitor, and handoff suspected illicit trafficking targets.

    In 2004, JIATF West relocated to Honolulu, HI from Alameda, Calif. In conjunction with the move, we developed a strategy with supporting activities to face the particular challenges of the Asia-Pacific region, and to meet the evolving needs of our law enforcement partners. JIATF West works closely with senior law enforcement leadership partners across the region to support major law enforcement operations.

    Today, JIATF West brings military and law enforcement capabilities together to combat drug-related transnational crime in the Asia-Pacific Region. JIATF West's top priority is supporting law enforcement in their efforts to reduce the illicit flow of methamphetamine, Amphetamine-Type Stimulants (ATS) and precursors intended for U.S. markets. JIATF West also has specific efforts to detect and monitor heroin and other illegal drugs originating in southeast and northeast Asia destined for U.S. markets.

    The JIATF West Area of Responsibility (AOR) mirrors the USPACOM AOR, excluding the JIATF-South Joint Operating Area (JOA) in the Eastern Pacific Ocean, east of 120° W. The JIATF West AOR is defined by the area east of 17° E to 120° W into the Pacific and Indian Oceans, and the Arctic Ocean portion east of 100° E to 95° W.

     Defense Intelligence Agency  Defense Intelligence Agency Drug Enforcement Administration  Drug Enforcement Administration
     Federal Bureau of Investigation  Federal Bureau of Investigation  National Geospatial Intelligence Agency  National Geospatial Intelligence Agency
     Naval Criminal Investigative Service Naval Criminal Investigation Service  United States Army United States Army
     United States Air Force United States Air Force  United States Coast Guard United States Coast Guard
     United States Customs and Border AgencyProtection United States Customs and Border AgencyProtection  United States Navy United States Navy
     United States Marine Corps United States Marine Corps  United States Immigration and Customs AgencyEnforcement United States Immigration and Customs AgencyEnforcement